Categories
LinkedIn

Best Practices For Posting On LinkedIn

[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”no” hundred_percent_height=”no” hundred_percent_height_scroll=”no” hundred_percent_height_center_content=”yes” equal_height_columns=”no” menu_anchor=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” status=”published” publish_date=”” class=”” id=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” padding_top=”” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”” padding_left=”” gradient_start_color=”” gradient_end_color=”” gradient_start_position=”0″ gradient_end_position=”100″ gradient_type=”linear” radial_direction=”center” linear_angle=”180″ background_color=”” background_image=”” background_position=”center center” background_repeat=”no-repeat” fade=”no” background_parallax=”none” enable_mobile=”no” parallax_speed=”0.3″ background_blend_mode=”none” video_mp4=”” video_webm=”” video_ogv=”” video_url=”” video_aspect_ratio=”16:9″ video_loop=”yes” video_mute=”yes” video_preview_image=”” filter_hue=”0″ filter_saturation=”100″ filter_brightness=”100″ filter_contrast=”100″ filter_invert=”0″ filter_sepia=”0″ filter_opacity=”100″ filter_blur=”0″ filter_hue_hover=”0″ filter_saturation_hover=”100″ filter_brightness_hover=”100″ filter_contrast_hover=”100″ filter_invert_hover=”0″ filter_sepia_hover=”0″ filter_opacity_hover=”100″ filter_blur_hover=”0″][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ layout=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” border_position=”all” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding_top=”” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”” padding_left=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” center_content=”no” last=”no” min_height=”” hover_type=”none” link=””][fusion_text columns=”” column_min_width=”” column_spacing=”” rule_style=”default” rule_size=”” rule_color=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_offset=””]

Listen to the podcast:

RELATED POSTS:


LinkedIn posting tips

LinkedIn posting tips

LinkedIn posting tips


Content Matters

Why should I create and share content on LinkedIn? Can I do without this “content marketing” thing? Well, these are frequently asked questions among those who are just getting started with inbound marketing on LinkedIn. 

And when I say content I am talking about creating your own unique content, your own insights, findings, results and not reposting other people’s content. I mean you can, of course, syndicate other sources, there is nothing wrong with that. However, I think if you are an expert-entrepreneur and position yourself as an authority in your own segment, creating and sharing your own content and voice is the best way to get recognition and help people along the way. 

Otherwise, how else would you showcase your expertise, how else would people know you’re skilled or expert in something if you keep silent. If you know a better way, please share it with me, I’d love to know. Not only that, I think it’s even selfish not to share what you know with the rest. It is some type of disservice to the public, so to speak.

Ok, what type of content to share in order to connect and engage with people? Typically you want to share something educational, something of value – it’s just the nature of this platform. 

Here are some ideas to get started. You can share something which you think your industry will look like in 2, 5, 10 years and how it will get there. Share important trends that people in your industry or area of expertise should know about. What are the challenges or opportunities you have faced or seized? What’s the biggest problem your ideal client has? What are their frustrations? And finally what concrete advice would you give someone who is getting started in your field? I am always for one or two concrete and actionable things, tips or techniques that people can take away and implement right away. 

But talking about the types of content more specifically post types, I’d like to share three main post types method that I learned from legendary Frank Kern about what to share on social media. His 3 post method gives some general guidelines for posting 3 times a day on social media for building your personal brand but I think LinkedIn has its own way and I’d modify and adapt it to this very platform. I mean you cannot post 3 or 6 times a day on LinkedIn as you would typically do on Instagram or Facebook. Though I see some people try to replicate this frequent posting behaviour from other social media platforms to LinkedIn. Maybe they’re testing something, I don’t know. I am curious to see the results if you could share them with me.

What I suggest my clients do and this is what I typically do myself is the following cadence 1 post a day with a rotation of three types of posts throughout a week. 

Connection Post

So, the first post type is a ‘connection’ post. The goal of this post is to create an emotional bond with your brand because people buy from people with who they resonate and feel understood. People buy from people when they feel understood not when they understand you. So that’s important to keep in mind when you try to connect and engage with your audience. 

‘How-To’ Post

The second type is the ‘how-to’ post. The goal of a ‘how-to’ post is to demonstrate your expertise, substance and create trust by delivering results in advance and by actually helping people. Well…, this is what I am currently doing with this video, hopefully, I provide value and create trust and goodwill and help along the way with my advice. Well, there is more than that which goes into what we teach at LinkedFormula such as your core messaging pillars that are actually the main things your audience needs to do or to know in order to get what they want. 

Offer Post

And, lastly, the 3rd type is an ‘offer’ post. What? Wait a second! You said an offer. Don’t you dare to make an offer and sell on LinkedIn! 

Well, while some folks preach not to make any offer or sell anything on LinkedIn, I think it’s totally ok and there is nothing wrong with that. As long as you provide value, you connect with your audience and create goodwill you still can make offers why not? After all, if we’re in business let’s not pretend that we are running charities (which is by the way nothing wrong with charities, I’m just saying this to underline that whoever is in business is not a not-for-profit organization).

And besides that, if you know your service or product is going to help someone why wouldn’t you? More than that if you see a right fit with a prospect you know you can help him or her why wouldn’t you? 

Nooo! You still should not pitch on LinkedIn! 

Really!? Seriously? And what about your LinkedIn messages, isn’t it a part of LinkedIn? Look at what’s happening there. I receive daily cold messages and I am sure you do as well from strangers who bluntly pitch their services in their very first message. 

Well, doing so is one thing, which is not the greatest experience – I agree. But creating goodwill over time and providing value in advance and then making offers is a totally different thing.

And by the way, an offer can be as simple as a newsletter sign-up or an invitation to a webinar. The bottom line is you still can make offers as long as you provide value and create goodwill and affinity with your brand. 

Just keep common sense and balance your content with a ratio of 3:1. For example, every other 3 days I would include some call-to-action in my posts on LinkedIn. For the rest of the days of the week, it will be content to connect and provide just value to my audience.

Sharing Content Consistently

Sharing content consistently has two goals. 

Goal #1: It helps you be on top of the mind of your audience all the time and build relationships with them. I call it top of a mind awareness farming strategy. Like a farmer, you have to take care of your garden, nurture, water it so you can reap the fruits of your work later. In a current noisy and overcrowded market, it’s hard to get and keep attention for a longer period of time. So you need to be constantly in front of your people so they keep consuming your content and if it resonates with them they can start working with you. 

Goal #2: Posting content consistently and regularly creates a habit around building your content. It’s a matter of habit like pretty much everything in this life. It is scientifically proven, in the beginning, it feels uncomfortable but when you keep doing something uncomfortable for a longer period of time, you now start feeling uncomfortable not doing the same exact thing that was uncomfortable to you in the past. This is how it works. This worked for me as well. I remember when I was uncomfortable sharing content but now I can’t wait to create more in order to share more because it’s now uncomfortable for me not to do it. Don’t believe me, do yourself a favor — start creating your own unique content and start sharing it for a few months consistently. 

@Mentioning In the Content

Even though LinkedIn encourages us to invite people in our conversations, posts, comments by mentioning them, I think we should not overuse the mentions as it gets annoying to some point. Well, if you comment or like it will notify the person anyways so they know, no need to mention them every single time. However, if this is something which is directly related to that person or you want to give a shoutout then yes definitely utilize that feature. 

Hashtags

Another way to get your content found and bump your discoverability is to use hashtags. Use a # number sign plus the topic of your content to indicate what your post is about. Hashtags are searchable and help your content get discovered. 

Usually, you want to use hashtags at the end of a post or an article. There is actually a separate section on LinkedIn where you can find and follow any hashtags you want so you can keep up with the content you’re interested in being shared by other people. It can be found in the bottom-left section of your LinkedIn homepage, called “Followed Hashtags.”

One thing to highlight here I wouldn’t go more than three hashtags maximum per content piece. Do not do hashtag stuffing because it’s not an Instagram and by doing so I believe you confuse LinkedIn algorithms as well, so one thing to keep in mind.

I typically go with two main hashtags for my topic, in this case, it will be for example #linkedin #contentmarketing and I will add my personal brand name as a hashtag or my company name as a hashtag just to give some visibility and love from algorithms to my brand awareness.  

Post With Images

Use your posts with images. The text limit is 1300 characters. If your content exceeds 1300 characters, LinkedIn suggests writing an article instead, using LinkedIn’s Publishing Platform. This way they encourage users to utilize different features of their platform which is great. But for some reason posts with images get more views. It seems like posts with images are being favored by the LinkedIn algorithm. Of course, nobody knows 100% but LinkedIn what’s out there and how it works – all we can do is to guesstimate.

But what I can tell from my own experience, common sense and logic I apply is when you scroll your feeds an image takes up the bigger space on the screen especially when you’re on mobile and IF the image is compelling enough and fulfills a pattern interrupt requirements to make a viewer stop scrolling then the chances are that your content will get more engagement. 

Interestingly enough my videos compared to images do not get that much engagement and views. Again I am talking from my own experience and I do not represent LinkedIn’s official standpoint obviously and nobody can, to be honest. Maybe my videos are not engaging enough. Who knows? Let me know down below if that’s the case. I’d love to hear your feedback by the way. But this is a topic for another conversation and maybe I’ll shoot a separate video and share my insights and analysis of testing out the videos and what I learned from them so far.


What’s Next?

If you are a coach, consultant, trainer, speaker or author, you want to discover the faster, easier way to get prospects and sales-qualified leads on LinkedIn today.

At LinkedFormula we help our clients sell their digital products and services on LinkedIn and shorten the sales cycle.

This system and processes we have at LinkedFormula can put you on track to hunt down your ideal clients relatively FAST.

If you’re interested in learning more about how we can solve your lead generation problem the first step is to get this FREE LinkedIn Guide

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Categories
LinkedIn

Outbound Prospecting And Sales On LinkedIn: [Interview With Hrachya Ghazaryan From Leadarto]

[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”no” hundred_percent_height=”no” hundred_percent_height_scroll=”no” hundred_percent_height_center_content=”yes” equal_height_columns=”no” menu_anchor=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” status=”published” publish_date=”” class=”” id=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” padding_top=”” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”” padding_left=”” gradient_start_color=”” gradient_end_color=”” gradient_start_position=”0″ gradient_end_position=”100″ gradient_type=”linear” radial_direction=”center” linear_angle=”180″ background_color=”” background_image=”” background_position=”center center” background_repeat=”no-repeat” fade=”no” background_parallax=”none” enable_mobile=”no” parallax_speed=”0.3″ background_blend_mode=”none” video_mp4=”” video_webm=”” video_ogv=”” video_url=”” video_aspect_ratio=”16:9″ video_loop=”yes” video_mute=”yes” video_preview_image=”” filter_hue=”0″ filter_saturation=”100″ filter_brightness=”100″ filter_contrast=”100″ filter_invert=”0″ filter_sepia=”0″ filter_opacity=”100″ filter_blur=”0″ filter_hue_hover=”0″ filter_saturation_hover=”100″ filter_brightness_hover=”100″ filter_contrast_hover=”100″ filter_invert_hover=”0″ filter_sepia_hover=”0″ filter_opacity_hover=”100″ filter_blur_hover=”0″][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ layout=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” border_position=”all” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding_top=”” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”” padding_left=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” center_content=”no” last=”no” min_height=”” hover_type=”none” link=””][fusion_text columns=”” column_min_width=”” column_spacing=”” rule_style=”default” rule_size=”” rule_color=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_offset=””]

Listen to the podcast:

RELATED POSTS:


Outbound Prospecting And Sales On LinkedIn Interview Transcript

Arthur: Hello everyone this is Arthur Khoyetsyan from LinkedFormula and today I have the pleasure to talk with Hrachya Ghazaryan who is a LinkedIn Coach, the Co-Founder and CEO of a LinkedIn B2B Lead Generation Agency, called Leadarto. Welcome Hrachya and it is so much pleasure to have you on this call!

Hrachya: Hello, Arthur. It’s actually my pleasure to be on this call. Thanks for having me here.

Arthur: Well, first of all, thank you so much for finding time to make it for this interview, you’re a busy person and it took a while until we were able to coordinate this interview. But we made it through and here we are. So just to give a little backstory for the benefit of our listeners who are watching us right now how we met and to know you better and why we are doing this interview. Funny enough I met Hrachya very recently on social media and we happened to be in the same group and got connected after this guy jumped in and helped me with the question I had. He was so generous and provided his help and so we ended up on a call and chatted. It was not a sales call, nothing of the kind, just a friendly and little bit of business chat. This is an example of how powerful sometimes connection on social media can be you don’t even realize.

So the reason why I thought it’s a great idea to have Hrachya on the call and interview him was that this guy knows so much about LinkedIn outbound prospecting and sales that I thought he must be heard and definitely this would add value to my audience. Well, we’re both kinda in the same space but you do things differently so I thought I should bring you have and people listen to how you do your stuff at Leadarto. Well, this is a kind of my quick intro of who Hrachya Ghazaryan is and how I met him. But I’ll let him give you first-hand information and try to pull golden nuggets out of him for those who are watching or listening now to get as much valuable information as possible. Hrachya, please tell us who you are, what you do and why you do that?

Hrachya: Well, thanks for the introduction, Arthur. And by the way, it was my pleasure to have the first initial call. And this is one of the things I really love about LinkedIn. Well, this is very cool just because of LinkedIn, right? We talked and we kind of got some conversation going and here we are having a really nice discussion, but hopefully nice discussion. Again, my pleasure and thanks for having me here A lttle bit about me. Even if you read my LinkedIn profile, the first thing that you will see a sentence that says, “I’m a loving and caring dad for my two kids.” That’s what I want everybody to know about me whenever they are talking to me. Besides that, I’m an Armenian, let’s start with that. I want to mention that as well. On top of that, I’m the CEO and Co-founder, as you said of Leadarto. So what we do at Leonardo is B2B lead generation through LinkedIn, through email marketing. And we also do LinkedIn coaching. Probably this should be enough as a starting point. If you have some more questions, maybe we can get along and kind of dig in.

Arthur: Absolutely. Yeah. That’s awesome. So, well, first and foremost let’s just start off with WHY? Why did you start Leadarto and what’s the story behind it? And why do you think LinkedIn is THE platform you needed to be and help others to succeed there as well?

Hrachya: Sure. Well, probably if some of the viewers are expecting some sort of romantic story behind this, probably it’s not going to happen. I have to disappoint you. So what happened was I have been in salesforce for as long as I can remember myself in some form of sales. And for the last 10 years, I’ve been in B2B and enterprise sales. Throughout my career, I’ve gained a lot of knowledge and experience. And thought that I must share my experience with others and maybe help others gain their targets done. The way we started was not necessarily as purely as the business we are having right now, but all started as a side business. Eventually, we grew up a bit. And, to be really frank last year during the COVID time, everybody was doing some kind of modifications, so I also made a clear decision to quit my main job and concentrate 100% of my time on my personal business. So things changed starting from that point on a lot. Regarding the second part of the question why LinkedIn? Well, if you are in B2B, I guess you shouldn’t go into TikTok or any other place, right?

Well, the recent numbers, I was checking, I think, it was over 760 million users right now. Of course, let’s not be naive, not all of them are active users. But the point is a lot of these people are active and they are in B2B space. Even if you look at some other tools or some databases – 99% of them are getting data from LinkedIn. So this is like a goldmine you need to be here. If you are in a B2B space, there’s a reason why LinkedIn. This is why I invested a lot of time, energy and money in training and coaching and mentorship. And that’s how I can tell you that I became some sort of an expert if I can call myself an expert.

Arthur: Absolutely. Yeah. I mean, that’s awesome. First of all, the story is great because like, when you say it’s not going to be a romantic, I mean… This time during COVID and pandemic will be remembered to be honest in both positive and negative ways. And your story is inspiring. Secondly, I keep saying that LinkedIn is no longer a platform for your online resume. So maybe it used to be a place for finding a job or career or whatever. But I’m going to disappoint all who expect us to talk about LinkedIn as a platform to find a job or anything like that.

Today, we’re talking about how to get clients and sales, right? And, I totally agree with you. Linkedin has drastically improved over the years, especially during recent years. And it’s a great place to be for B2B as well as for getting clients. Also it’s going to be improving over time, for sure. Let’S talk a little bit about the concept of outbound prospecting on LinkedIn. And let’s assume we talk to a person who has little or no understanding of what outbound prospecting on LinkedIn is at all and how different it is from inbound prospecting?

Hrachya: Sure, well before even answering the question I should mention there is clearly a difference between the profiles who are trying to find jobs, you are absolutely right. And the profiles, who are trying to sell their offers or do some business on LinkedIn, right? And if you want to do business, you either have to play the content game, i.e. You have to post content and constantly engage with people who are engaging with you back. Or, you have to do the outbound or outreach part. Inbound part of it is you put out content and you wait for others to come to your door and knock on your door. Wheres, when we’re talking about outreach or outbound strategies, this is when you are being more proactive and you are going and knocking on other’s people’s doors.

And you are trying to understand what they’re up to, what their pain points are, etc., and you’re trying to understand if this is a good fit. But to be very clear in recent years and especially in the recent year, a lot of people are really destroying this market. I’m sure we’re going to talk about this, but I just can’t help mentioning this right now that a lot of people are just purely pitching their services, their offers. They don’t really care about anything. So this is why some people think outreach is a bad thing. But if done correctly, if done in a professional manner, this is one of the best ways to actually get customers.

Arthur: Yeah, absolutely. I agree with you and you kind of partially answered my next question… I know you guys at Leadarto work with many clients internationally and help businesses generate leads through LinkedIn. Why do you think outbound prospecting is the best strategy for this or maybe not? Can you tell me more about that and how differently you guys do at Leadarto?

Hrachya: By the way, thanks for mentioning the international aspect, because taking this chance, I would like to say that we are working with customers from 11 countries right now. I’m pretty proud of that. Well, to answer your question, it’s not really the perfect or the best strategy, but it is a perfect combination of inbound and outbound. This will be the perfect option. But let’s concentrate on the outbound one right now. What do we do differently? When I’m asked this question, usually the first thing that pops up in my mind is to mention that our messaging is dramatically different versus a lot of our competitors.

I don’t want to go too much into the details of messaging right now, but still, the point is you will never see me or anyone from my customers who were helping out directly pitching from the first message. Because if you’re especially a C-level executive, you’re getting tens of messages on LinkedIn daily. And, almost all of them are written like this, “Hey, my name is such and such. I’m selling this. Would you like to buy it? Or let’s jump on a call.” So that’s the number one thing, which we never do. Instead, we have conversation starters. And, instead, we have actually some ways of getting involved in some really meaningful conversations. Plus we also have a qualifying process, which means that instead of just saying, “Hey, would you like to jump on a call” without any prior history, which really is not a good practice, we start to qualify them.

We start asking questions, trying to understand what are the pain points? What are the bottlenecks? Maybe they don’t even need our help. Maybe they are doing something better than we can suggest or offer to do. So, whenever people are pitching me I usually tell them, Hey, if you don’t know my situation, if you don’t know what my pain points are if you don’t know what I’m struggling with and where I want to be, how can you offer a solution? So the point is a conversation starter is a qualifying process that equals pre-qualified or warm leads. The other thing we don’t do we are not using any automation tools. We are using manpower as much as possible and trying to do everything manually. We have really nice girls and guys who are doing the job of the SDRs. Of course, it’s more costly, more resourceful, but the quality is really, really good.

Arthur: Yeah, that sounds great. I mean, you’ve brought so many good points and I’m sure we’re going to talk about the messaging, how to start a conversation on LinkedIn, which is a kind of hot topic as well as pitching. I am getting so many messages throughout the day. And the funny thing is that people would pitch me without going to my profile and seeing what I do. And they go like, “Hey, do you need any help with LinkedIn?” It’s so funny the other day, the guy was pitching me straight on real estate. I said, dude, I’m not in real estate. And he goes, Oh, my bad, that is probably an automation thing, whatever. So I’m seeing those people not doing their research at all. For the listeners and those who are watching us right now can you share some actionable prospecting tips or techniques with the audience that they can take and implement right away?

Hrachya: I’ll actually do a bit of cheating right now. Why cheating? Because literally today there was another guy who approached me a fellow Armenian who was just starting out and asking me to give him great advice. If you are doing prospecting on the scale, you should be using some sort of a system like, like it can be a CRM, etc. In our case, we use a paid CRM system because it’s much easier for us and it’s really worth it. But you don’t even have to do that. I mean, you can use some free options of CRMs, I believe. If not a CRM, you can use Trello, Google sheets. But the worst case is probably a piece of paper. But if you are prospecting on scale meaning you are not talking to, say 10 people per month but you you’re talking close to a thousand people per month. Technically, it’s not possible to remember all these conversations. And if you don’t have a system that is backing it up, eventually you will lose track of conversations. And you are on LinkedIn, you are active on LinkedIn, and whoever else is active on LinkedIn will confirm that LinkedIn inbox is terrible. You’re going to lose all the conversations. Even with CRM system. Trust me every now and then like one or two conversations are getting lost. And, we like, where the hell is this person?

This is probably going to be my first thing. If you are using prospecting or if you’re going to be doing outreach on LinkedIn, make sure before you even start, you have some sort of system to support it. The second thing again, cheating and taking from the advice earlier today, I would say follow-ups are really being unrated. Maybe you were expecting some sort of a different answer here, but I’m giving a bit of common sense recommendation here. Trust me, a lot of people are really not doing any follow-up or if they’re doing it, maybe not correctly. Many, many times people don’t get back to you. It doesn’t mean they hate you or they don’t want to talk to you. They are just really busy, especially if you’re prospecting, there is a high chance you’re going to be prospecting C-level executives, right? So these people are getting tons of emails and messages on a daily basis. So you need to fight for that attention. Maybe they want to talk to you, but they got lost, right? So you need to follow up. Again, referring back to and tying the CRM and follow-up together. If you don’t have a CRM, you won’t be able to follow up. But I also want to quickly talk about follow-up types. Because when I say follow-up a lot of people think it’s a message like this long, No. It can be, of course, one or two messages. For example, the first one is really random one. Like, “Hey, like, have you seen my message type thing, right?

In the second one, I could give some sort of a hint about what I was going to talk about. So maybe if I’m talking to you, I would say, “Hey, Arthur, like I was trying to get if you are interested in organic leads.” But the other thing is that you can also follow up with people through other LinkedIn features. It gives us really good opportunities in this regard. Simple examples, just visit their profile – they’ll get a notification there. Or, just endorse a skill. If this person is posting content, just like that content make a meaningful comment on their posts. This way guaranteed you will pop up in their feeds and their notifications. Isn’t it a follow-up? It is a follow-up! So follow-ups via CRM and the combination of these two probably would be the best takeaways that people can implement from day one or day two.

Arthur: These are really great tips, to be honest, and they seem to be simple, but don’t underestimate the power of simplicity. Like you said when you endorse a skill, LinkedIn would send you a message, something like, “Say thanks to the person who endorsed you.” Just another message and notification that appears as a red dot on your profile. It is scientifically proven that we’re so addicted to these red dots on our profiles. I mean, everyone is addicted to it because it’s made on purpose. People would go and check them out to see who endorsed them or who visited their profiles. And to your point of a follow-up. I don’t remember the source who said that but they say the money’s not in the list, but money is in the follow-up. So they used to say that if you have a big list, for example, now I’m talking about an email list, the money would be in the list. But I mean, if you have a dead list, so who cares, right? The bottom line is you have to follow up with people, you just need to remind them. And these are indeed actionable steps. Thank you! This leads us to one of the most important pieces of LinkedIn marketing which is your profile that I call a “beacon or magnet of client attraction”. To this date, I see so many profiles on the platform that are not optimized for sales and clients. And just to clarify here, we’re talking about the profile optimized for clients for sales, not for recruiters or employers or career. This is a totally different conversation. But from your experience why do you think the LinkedIn profile is so important and at Leadarto do you actually provide the so-called LinkedIn profile makeover services?

Hrachya: Okay. Thank you. Linkedin profile is very critical and recent studies show that a person spends about three to four seconds on your profile. So within three to four seconds, your profile, any sales-oriented or business-oriented profile needs to answer one simple question. Why I should give you my money? Why I should hire you? This is the question you should answer. The profile needs to be like a landing page. What I mean is we have three, four seconds. And withing this time-frame you need also answer the questions such as who you are helping, how you are helping and what can you bring to the table? Of course not going into all the details of a summary of the profile but I’d like to really take chance and mention two big things, which in my personal opinion, are very critical.

First, your LinkedIn profile cover image is a very good place to showcase your expertise or show your skills. Or maybe your services and offers you are trying to get to the customer. And, the second your summary section. Again it should answer some questions such as why they should be working with you, how you are going to do it or what will be the outcome of working with you. But there is one thing that makes a difference, kind of answering in a bit, your previous question what’s different about us. It’s not really a big difference maybe, but I like to say that you need to have some sort of personal touch to the summary section. And I can tell you why I came to this conclusion, to be frank.

From my own example, because what happened was when I was trying to write my own summary section the first thing that popped up in my mind was my kids. So at that time I swore, I didn’t think even about the importance of personal touch in the summary section. I just did whatever I felt. I was just being myself. But what happened afterwards was that I got literally hundreds of messages and feedback from people, customers, non-customers friends that this was cool that you were talking about your personal thing here on LinkedIn. So we started testing with a few profiles and we came to the conclusion this was really important regardless of it’s being enterprise or B2B sales, again, we all know this, that people are buying from people.

So they want to understand that it’s not a robot behind it or a sales machine. They want to know they are talking to a real human being, which is me or you, or whoever. Regarding the last part of your question about whether we are providing LinkedIn profile makeover services or not. Well, this is funny because a few weeks ago I did a poll on LinkedIn. I don’t know if you have seen it or not but the bottom line was if I should provide this service as a paid service and how much I should charge. Even though the results of the poll were positive and people were ready to pay, I believe somewhere from 100 to 200 bucks for this until this point I’m not providing that service. But we do provide a really detailed profile audit, which means it’s not a template, It’s not a checklist. I personally go into your profile, check all the details, starting from URL, images, quality of texts, everything. And I provide you with a 10 to 15 point recommendation on what needs to be modified. But the modification itself is being done by the customer.

Arthur: That sounds good. I find it interesting when you mentioned the fact about your kids and adding a personal touch in a LinkedIn summary. This is so interesting. I mean, on one hand, you might think this is a professional business platform where you don’t talk about your personal life. But funny enough when you go to LinkedIn help or support documentation, you would see them encouraging you to talk about your personal life as well for example about your wins, losses, transformation. And again, they say it’s not B2B – it’s more P2P people to people. The approach I have maybe a little bit different but I keep saying that your LinkedIn profile is not about you. It’s all about the client, which actually goes hand-in-hand with what you said in beginning. Like the first thing, when someone goes to your LinkedIn profile, they want to see what’s in it for me. How can this person help? If you take that perspective, then your LinkedIn profile should not be about you like how great you are or stuff like that. It should definitely tell what you do and how you can help, but it also should have a personal touch. So it’s a sort of combination of both if it makes sense.

Hrachya: I agree with you actually, it’s a bit difficult to come up with a perfect match. That’s why you need to test to see what works actually. And what the most important thing is that it needs to resonate with you. Because you can’t really measure it by how successful it is, but you can measure how well it resonates with you.

Arthur: Yeah. And another thing, since we’re talking about the profile, what I’ve found through testing was that every three to four, maybe five months, I changed my summary or maybe headline and see how it worked. And, every time I change it I noticed traffic to the profile goes down because the algorithm is trying to understand now who I am or what I’m doing. I’m not suggesting to make drastic changes to what you’re doing every time but you would change it anyways, because first of all, your business changes, your goals are changing. You cannot stay the same – you will be different this or next year from what you were last year. So you modify and fine-tune your message therefore you have to change your message and your profile accordingly. And each time I do, I see some kind of slight difference in traffic and then it stabilizes. Another thing, I’d also like to suggest s editing the “Skills” section of your profile. LinkedIn allows us to add up to 50 skills. Just use these 50 skills and add them to that section. These are actually the search words, the keywords that help you with findability. You actually help LinkedIn by saying, “Hey, LinkedIn, I’m good at this so find my profile in accordance with these keywords.”

Hrachya: I absolutely agree with you. And by the way, I don’t know if I’ve ever told you during our first conversation, but my first ever customer followed me through keywords I optimized my profile for. I haven’t done any outreach. I haven’t even posted a single post on LinkedIn yet. And what happened was this guy sent me a connection request invitation, we got connected. Then he asked me if I could help him with lead generation as my profile was optimized for those keywords and he found me using a search for “B2B and lead generation”. This is how important LinkedIn profile optimization is. That is a true story. My first customer came from a keyword search and he found my profile.

Arthur:

Absolutely. You need to optimize your profile really well. I mean, I’m not saying you’re going to get clients every day just by optimizing your profile but it’s really important. Cool. I can’t help asking about the messaging and starting conversation on LinkedIn? Without revealing obviously all the secret recipes you guys have with your messaging strategy what can you say what works best now in terms of message sequencing and how to talk to people without being salesy but using emotional intelligence? Can you share any tips or insights with us?

Hrachya: Sure. Before I even answer the question thanks for not asking the secrets of our secret sauce. No matter what you do, people still understand that you are trying to sell something. However, people mind being sold to, but they don’t like to be pitched. So rule number one, do not pitch! How to start conversations? We do not use any templates, any specific set of questions we have for customers. Let’s say if I’m working with 50 customers, I have 50 different conversation starters. This is critical. And the way I like to construct this messaging by asking my customer. Imagine you are at a physical networking event, not, a virtual but a real physical event. And you’re approaching your potential customer. And besides “Hey, how are you doing? Where are you from” regular thing, how do you start your conversations? You don’t go and tell them straight, “Hey, I’m such and such and I’m selling this, pay me.” To be more specific, I would probably ask something like, “Hey, Arthur are you using LinkedIn to get your pipeline full or to get your B2B leads or to get paying customers?” Of course, I’m not going to go into the details of all customers we’re working with but there are 2 logical components in a messaging sequence. First of all and most importantly, they need to be very short. Some people are mixing up email marketing with LinkedIn messaging. It needs to be a maximum of two sentences, preferably to have only one sentence.

It should be either a “yes” or “no” question – the question that requires a yes or no answer. Or, it can be either answer or a question. We can also ask, for example, are you doing this or are you doing that? The challenge and the most difficult part is to come up with that correct question. Because first of all, it needs to be in the domain within the topic and if possible, it needs also showcase your expertise. If you are in the LinkedIn space I would ask you, “Are you doing outreach or you’re doing the content game”?

There are two reasons why I recommend doing this. The first one is as you mentioned more on the sales-oriented and psychological side of things. Because if it’s easy for me to answer that question, I’m more likely to answer that question. And, if I answer the question, I’ll keep talking to you. That’s more on the psychological side of things. But there’s also the second important aspect, which is more on the technical side of things. From my experience, I can tell you that if your response rate is too low for some period of time, eventually what will happen is LinkedIn will suspend your profile or limit your profile to a certain level. Why? Because they believe you are spamming people. And to some extent, it might be true. So, in order not to get into that trouble, you need to sure people are responding to your messages.

For that reason, it’s easy to start conversations with easy questions. And again, just to be clear, the goal of the conversation starter is to start a conversation but not to sell anything or offer anything ask for anything. That’s, that’s the part of messaging which is probably the most crucial one. And after that, we go with the qualifying process, which is again, different from business to business. But the idea is to ask your potential customer and understand if it is the right person to talk to. What are the pain points? Where are the bottlenecks? What is the expectation or what is the outcome they are trying to achieve?

And just to be clear, I don’t believe it’s possible to 100% qualify a personal LinkedIn, but I do believe it is possible to pre-qualify to a level that you already warm it up a bit, and you understand that he wants to have a conversation. And this is a fact that in 99.9% of cases when we ask them to jump on a call the answer is yes. Why? Because we didn’t ask it early. We wait until the person is ready and he wants it. Then we only ask if we can jump on a call and discuss some more details. I hope, I answered your question.

Arthur: Yes. There are so many teaching points here. Thanks so much. I hope this is really helpful for those who are watching or listening again. I’d like to add to that. It’s not like email marketing, so, you cannot spam people. And, I’m glad that LinkedIn made it this way because imagine what could have happened. The so-called social selling index that LinkedIn has in place, the SSI score is on purpose. Because LinkedIn wants us to play by their rules including messaging. And, the response rate is actually part of how you are assessed. There are four parts to the SSI Score and the messaging and conversations are also being a part of that. I appreciate your insight. I think we’ve touched upon that but still, you said that you don’t do automation because you want to sound natural like a human. However, any tools, software you guys are using that you could recommend or share as battle-tested tools from your arsenal required for LinkedIn outbound prospecting?

Hrachya: Well, to start with and to be very clear, I’m not saying these tools are evil. But my belief is that technology should not eliminate the human touch. This is very critical for me and for our business. The reason why we are not using these tools is that there are some risks related to them. First of all, LinkedIn doesn’t like these tools you can get your account suspended and blocked either temporarily or forever. This is number one. And when working with customers, of course, this is the last thing we would like to do to block anybody’s profile. The second thing is these tools are not smart enough yet. Maybe in a year or two, they will be smarter than all of us, but at this stage, they cannot really be selective.

What happens you can sometimes find yourself in a funny and goofy situation, not always though but every now and then when either the tool will not understand the first name or even worse some tools will not even detect the name. And trust me there is no such tool that 100% can guarantee that they will understand all the texts, all the icons, all the special characters, people are placing into their names. What happened once within our organization we were testing some message follow-ups and the tool kept sending the message without understanding the answer. I don’t want to mention the name of this tool, it’s a pretty popular one. It doesn’t happen all the time maybe 0.1 or even lower percent of the times but it’s about my reputation, my business and or customer’s business, I don’t want to risk that. As for the tools we use a scraper tool, called LinkMatch, which is very helpful for us. It’s really saving us a lot of time. It scrapes the contact information of our prospects from LinkedIn and immediately with two clicks transfers to our CRM.

Other than that, I don’t want to recommend any specific tools because we just don’t use them ourselves. These tools are much cheaper than the real people working for us because. If the average price for an automation LinkedIn tool is about $50 bucks, it is not really a big deal for a lead generation business. But if you are paying virtual assistants the cost can be many, many times more. However, this is the way we do business. We prefer to pay more, have lower margins, but to be safer and be of higher quality.

Arthur: Absolutely, reputation and brand matter. I agree with you. You cannot risk, a client’s account, like you’ve said that this is the last thing you want to have the client’s account blocked. Well, wrapping up this great conversation, what would you say or recommend to our listeners and who are watching us right now, what is one or two things they need to know or have or do to be successful with LinkedIn as a platform?

Hrachya: It is a good question. I’d say just be active on LinkedIn because there are many people and it was about me like a couple of years ago as well. I have been on LinkedIn since I believe 2011 over 10 years but for the first five years, I was totally a side-viewer. And I was one of those people who didn’t even like any content because I didn’t want others to know what I was liking, who I was following, etc. I thought it was a private and personal thing. It’s a mentality I guess. But later I’ve realized that the more you use it, the more opportunities are coming your way. Actually, this very conversation we’re having right now is the result of it. If any of us was a side-viewer, we would not even talk to each other right now.

Arthur: That’s a great example. Like I said in the beginning, we literally met recently on social media besides the fact that I am Armenian too but I wouldn’t know Hrachya if I wasn’t active on social media and he wouldn’t jump in and help me with his solution. That’s a living example, so sorry to interrupt.

Hrachya: My main point is that it is really about networking. It’s not just social media, but really a good opportunity to network with people. Whenever we’re posting content we’re getting happy when it is getting a lot of engagement, right? Today you have seen my first video ever on LinkedIn.Yes, people are liking it but the bottom line is that it’s all about real networking. Eventually, it’s not about likes but genuinely being interested in people and making some real connections here. And the truth is that I’m very active on LinkedIn. I’ve started posting content since last December and I have made a lot of connections since then even though I have not met these people in person. And this is all thanks to LinkedIn. So my number one advice is just to be very active on LinkedIn. Don’t be a side-viewer, regardless if you’re on LinkedIn or in your real life just be authentic.

Don’t copy others. And just be yourself. I’m not expecting everybody to like me. But I need to be myself because that’s part of me, that’s part of my personal brand and that’s just part of like all of us. So, probably these two things as a key takeaway. But just because we were talking about outbound prospecting again my recommendation would be to pitch people and make sure you have some system to follow-up with people and have all the information in it. That’s probably my advice to listeners to take away from this conversation.

Arthur: Yeah. I cannot agree more with and one thing to add to being active on LinkedIn is that sometimes people don’t realize when they’re being side-viewers like you’ve said and afraid to like, comment or share other people’s content thinking that they are giving more visibility or credit especially to a competitor it’s not actually the only case. LinkedIn actually gives credits and so to speak points to you for liking and sharing and commenting on other people’s posts. And, it’s made on purpose so people could interact with each other. And actually, by giving away likes or comments you are adding more points to your SSI score, a social selling index score that we just talked about. And lastly, how do people get in contact with you? How can they reach out to you? Or do you have anything to share with them?

Hrachya: I’m almost 24/7 online and the best way to get in touch with me is by contacting me on LinkedIn. And if what we’ve been talking about during this interview, if this somehow resonates with people, they can contact me and I can provide a free LinkedIn profile audit or messaging sequence audit whichever they choose. I’m ready to do it for free.

Arthur: Awesome. That’s really cool. Thanks so much. Please take advantage of that. So it’s a free audit of your message sequence or LinkedIn profile. Am I right? Get contact with Hrachya and have your message sequence and LinkedIn profile audited for free. Well, thank you so much. I appreciate your time and thank you for making time for this interview. And I hope this is not the last time and we will meet at least virtually for the time being. And when I am next time in Armenia, I’m going to come and visit you and will chat in person. But for those who are watching and listening to us right now. Please let us know, just give us your feedback. If this is something like Hrachya said had resonated with you, if this is useful or it’s not useful, you liked or disliked it, we don’t know. So just let us know if we’re doing the right thing or the right job. Are there any topics you would like us to talk about? Just let us know. This interview will be posted on different platforms so you can comment below about it. And again, thanks so much Hrachya and I wish you a great day ahead and thank you. Take care.

Hrachya: I really appreciate your time. I really appreciate this discussion. It was a very nice one. Very interesting one. And I really enjoy it. You are right this should not be the last one. And we should keep doing this and find some more common topics to discuss. So thanks for having me and everybody have a great one.


What’s Next?

If you are a coach, consultant, trainer, speaker or author, you want to discover the faster, easier way to get prospects and sales-qualified leads on LinkedIn today.

At LinkedFormula we help our clients sell their digital products and services on LinkedIn and shorten the sales cycle.

This system and processes we have at LinkedFormula can put you on track to hunt down your ideal clients relatively FAST.

If you’re interested in learning more about how we can solve your lead generation problem the first step is to get this FREE LinkedIn Guide

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Categories
LinkedIn

LinkedIn Profile vs Page: What Works Better For Business Growth?

[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”no” hundred_percent_height=”no” hundred_percent_height_scroll=”no” hundred_percent_height_center_content=”yes” equal_height_columns=”no” menu_anchor=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” status=”published” publish_date=”” class=”” id=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” padding_top=”” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”” padding_left=”” gradient_start_color=”” gradient_end_color=”” gradient_start_position=”0″ gradient_end_position=”100″ gradient_type=”linear” radial_direction=”center” linear_angle=”180″ background_color=”” background_image=”” background_position=”center center” background_repeat=”no-repeat” fade=”no” background_parallax=”none” enable_mobile=”no” parallax_speed=”0.3″ background_blend_mode=”none” video_mp4=”” video_webm=”” video_ogv=”” video_url=”” video_aspect_ratio=”16:9″ video_loop=”yes” video_mute=”yes” video_preview_image=”” filter_hue=”0″ filter_saturation=”100″ filter_brightness=”100″ filter_contrast=”100″ filter_invert=”0″ filter_sepia=”0″ filter_opacity=”100″ filter_blur=”0″ filter_hue_hover=”0″ filter_saturation_hover=”100″ filter_brightness_hover=”100″ filter_contrast_hover=”100″ filter_invert_hover=”0″ filter_sepia_hover=”0″ filter_opacity_hover=”100″ filter_blur_hover=”0″][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ layout=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” border_position=”all” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding_top=”” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”” padding_left=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” center_content=”no” last=”no” min_height=”” hover_type=”none” link=””][fusion_text columns=”” column_min_width=”” column_spacing=”” rule_style=”default” rule_size=”” rule_color=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_offset=””]

RELATED POSTS:


LinkedIn Personal Profile or LinkedIn Page? Do I put my energy into building a LinkedIn Page for my brand versus promoting it through my own LinkedIn member profile? 

People keep asking this question all the time and when I was getting started on LinkedIn I was faced with this dilemma myself. 

Which works better? And the answer is it depends. There is no blanket answer to it because situations vary, goals are different etc. But ideally you should be using both and here’s why. 

In this training, I’ll give you five key differences and benefits of promoting your business both on your personal profile as well as LinkedIn page. 

Difference #1:

The critical difference is that on LinkedIn business pages you have followers whereas on your personal profile – you have connections. Think of some networking event, a conference or workshop where people meet each other and introduce themselves, talk with each other and exchange business cards. This is what you can actually do on this massive virtual networking platform using your LinkedIn profile. 

At the same conference you may have seen various vendor booths set up in the hallway which are actual businesses and in LinkedIn terms represent company pages. At the end of the day people do business with people even though they represent companies. In LinkedIn ecosystem relationships building and nurturing can only be done through personal profile. You cannot message, like, comment or congratulate on someone’s accomplishments via your LinkedIn page – you can do that through your member’s profile. 

Difference # 2:

On the flip side, there is an obvious benefit of having a LinkedIn page that allows you to promote your business or personal brand through advertising. You need a LinkedIn business page to run ads from. You cannot run ads using your personal profile on LinkedIn. LinkedIn company page pretty much like Facebook page helps with branding. It has its own logo, banner, about, section and you can link your business page and make it visible in the Experience section of your LinkedIn personal profile. 

LinkedIn company pages have other bells and whistles like showcase pages which can feature your different services and products under the umbrella of your company page. You can create events and promote your workshops, seminars, masterclasses, webinars, etc. For that reason, I will still keep a business page anyway given that LinkedIn business pages have a good standing with Google from an SEO perspective assuming that your company page is well optimized, complete and updated. 

Difference #3:

If you are a solopreneur, consultant or a coach, in the initial stages I’d focus on growing my connections network through personal profile. However, I’d still keep my company page updated and will post content regularly. Here is a pro tip: if you share a post, video or any content on your personal profile, you can share the same content on your LinkedIn company page using the page account from your profile. This way you’ll never run out of content ideas on what to post and will keep your company page up to date.  

Do the reverse by sharing original updates and content from the company onto your personal profile to help boost the company page and bring in more followers. See what works better and what brings the most engagement and visibility. Learn how to optimize your LinkedIn personal profile for sales

 As your personal brand or business grows really big or you are already a big business or a corporation, then definitely your focus and marketing efforts should be around the LinkedIn company page. Think of a company page as headquarters or a hub where all your multiple products or services are hosted. Now, your company page becomes a sort of mini-website where you share news, updates, current events, job openings, engage employees etc. 

But even now, you should not underestimate the power of personal profile to help boost the company page even further. This is why it’s ideal if you’re using both your personal profile and company page in any case. As the best practice the CEO or anyone from the executive team (ideally one person who is nominated to be the face of the company) should be using their LinkedIn personal profile to engage with their own network by sharing company news, updates and milestones and be the catalyst for the business. 

Difference #4:

You must have a company page to promote your business through running targeted LinkedIn ads. We have touched upon this difference and benefit a little bit earlier but I’d like to expand more on this. Even though LinkedIn’s average cost per click is considered to be high, the CPA (cost per acquisition) of a new client is significantly lower compared to Facebook or even Google taking into account that LinkedIn advertising is incredibly targeted and some industries make an average sale of $10K-$30K. So, I personally believe there is a huge potential with LinkedIn ads no matter what. 

Pro tip: go ahead and create a LinkedIn insight tag and install it on your website or funnel even if you don’t advertise now. Insight tag which is a LinkedIn version of Facebook pixel allows you to gain insights about your website audience, track and retarget page visitors. So, you want to collect this valuable information now and once you are ready to advertise on LinkedIn you’ll be set and ready to go. 

Lastly, LinkedIn company page analytics helps you with insights on your visitors, their job function, location, seniority, industry, company size, as well as your company updates and followers. Lots of great information! 

I hope by now you are sold on the need to spend efforts on the company page and running targeted ads on LinkedIn. If not now, at some point in your business growth you will be promoting your services and products on LinkedIn using super targeted ads to reach a wider audience and scale. At LinkedFormula we help our clients with LinkedIn advertising and run ads for them. 

Difference #5:

The benefit of having LinkedIn company pages is that it can give your employees a voice by sharing the company’s best posts on LinkedIn. Sharing company page posts can bring in significant organic engagement and reach. Imagine having over 200 employees and each sharing company’s post in their own connections networks. 

This is why companies need to give their employees a voice to be their own brand ambassadors and create a feeling of ownership and belongingness. But that’s another topic for discussion for the next time.  

Back to LinkedIn pages. One of the cool features they have is the ability to target your organic Page posts to a specific language, location, region, university, function, seniority, industry, or company size. This is especially useful if you’re a global brand or company with multiple geographic audiences and languages. Whereas with your personal profile you don’t have that feature and you can only target anyone on or off LinkedIn, your connections only, groups and events members. 

With a company page you can optimize your content with a powerful analytics tool. You can understand your page visitors and followers better and what types of content they engage with the most. 

With all these differences, advantages and disadvantages I think LinkedIn company page and personal profile should work in tandem to get the most out of your LinkedIn marketing efforts. As I mentioned in the beginning of the video there is no blanket answer to which works better? The answer is always it depends. But now you know why you should be using both. 

Hope this was useful and gave you some insights on which direction to go. If yes, let me know by commenting down below what other differences, advantages or disadvantages you know that I’ve missed in this training. 

What’s Next?

If you are a coach, consultant, trainer, speaker or author, you want to discover the faster, easier way to get prospects and sales qualified leads on LinkedIn today.

At LinkedFormula we help our clients sell their digital products and services on LinkedIn and shorten the sales cycle.

This system and processes we have at LinkedFormula can put you on track to hunt down your ideal clients relatively FAST.

If you’re interested in learning more about how we can solve your lead generation problem the first step is to get the this FREE LinkedIn Guide

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Categories
LinkedIn

How To Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile For Sales

[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”no” hundred_percent_height=”no” hundred_percent_height_scroll=”no” hundred_percent_height_center_content=”yes” equal_height_columns=”no” menu_anchor=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” status=”published” publish_date=”” class=”” id=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” padding_top=”” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”” padding_left=”” gradient_start_color=”” gradient_end_color=”” gradient_start_position=”0″ gradient_end_position=”100″ gradient_type=”linear” radial_direction=”center” linear_angle=”180″ background_color=”” background_image=”” background_position=”center center” background_repeat=”no-repeat” fade=”no” background_parallax=”none” enable_mobile=”no” parallax_speed=”0.3″ background_blend_mode=”none” video_mp4=”” video_webm=”” video_ogv=”” video_url=”” video_aspect_ratio=”16:9″ video_loop=”yes” video_mute=”yes” video_preview_image=”” filter_hue=”0″ filter_saturation=”100″ filter_brightness=”100″ filter_contrast=”100″ filter_invert=”0″ filter_sepia=”0″ filter_opacity=”100″ filter_blur=”0″ filter_hue_hover=”0″ filter_saturation_hover=”100″ filter_brightness_hover=”100″ filter_contrast_hover=”100″ filter_invert_hover=”0″ filter_sepia_hover=”0″ filter_opacity_hover=”100″ filter_blur_hover=”0″][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ layout=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” border_position=”all” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding_top=”” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”” padding_left=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” center_content=”no” last=”no” min_height=”” hover_type=”none” link=””][fusion_text columns=”” column_min_width=”” column_spacing=”” rule_style=”default” rule_size=”” rule_color=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_offset=””]

RELATED POSTS:


LinkedIn Profile represents you and your personal brand on LinkedIn and not only. Your LinkedIn profile will likely be the first thing when people search for your name – so you want to make a great first impression. Don’t believe me? Go ahead to any search engine like Google, Bing and Yahoo and type your name and see what comes up.

In this training I will give a very quick LinkedIn profile optimization checklist which you can download down below this video. 

A disclaimer before we move on. Your LinkedIn profile is NOT your resume especially when you are an entrepreneur and leverage this platform for your business growth. Keeping this in mind this profile optimization checklist is specifically designed for entrepreneurs ideally coaches, consultants and trainers. And, as prospects scan your profile, they should be able to understand exactly what you do, what you have to offer and how you are going to help them. In other words, LinkedIn profile is NOT about you, it’s about your prospects and eventually clients. 

Ok, let’s get started:

Name

Use your full real name, leave the nicknames behind and do not include any icons, special characters or use solely upper or lower case.

Profile Picture

Did you know that having a professional-looking profile photo can increase profile views by 14x? This is one of the first things a prospect will see, so use a professional, smiling, approachable photo in the white or professional looking background.

Headline

The headline comes just underneath the profile picture, and with only 120 characters to spare it needs to be succinct and to the point. Use this space for attracting people you want and repelling those you don’t. Your refined marketing statement, highlighting your customers’ potential problems and your ability to solve them, goes here.

Summary

Use this space to talk to your ideal client by highlighting their pains, needs, and wants. Position yourself as someone who understands them and has a full capacity and willingness to help. Then you conclude this part with some call-to-actions such as:

  • DM for more info 
  • Book a call
  • Get my free resource

User Friendly URL

Claim your public profile URL (see beneath your photograph on your own LinkedIn profile) and include your name and a relevant keyword. 

linkedin profile

Experience

Make sure to complete all relevant current and past work positions. Add fried but clear description for each position. Use your target keyword in title and description, so you will be found when people search for your skills. 

Education

Complete the education section by providing details about your school, degree, field of study, grade, activities, years attended, and a description.

Licenses and Certifications

Add any certificates or licenses you have by providing details about the institution, issue date, expiration date (if any), and years. You can also add a URL to the credential if available online. 

Skills & Endorsements

LinkedIn allows you to add up to 50 skills to your profile – make sure to use all 50 of them. It’s crucial to be strategic here and use the skills you want to be found for on LinkedIn. In other words, treat skills as keyword phrases to increase your ability to be found on the platform. 

Recommendations

Recommendations are the LinkedIn version of its social proof. Recommendations on your profile adds to your credibility. You can both receive and give recommendations. Treat them as your image and reputation on this platform. 

Accomplishments

Here is the full list of examples that you can add as an accomplishment on your LinkedIn profile if available:

  • Publication
  • Patent
  • Course
  • Project
  • Honor & Award
  • Test Score
  • Language 
  • Organization 

Profile Completion

Ensure your profile is 100% complete and that you’ve completed all the sections as much as possible giving your prospects a better idea of how qualified you are. When someone searches on LinkedIn, the results favour profiles which are 100% complete. 

These are the main sections of your LinkedIn profile as of this recording and this was the quick optimization checklist you can start implementing right away to improve your visibility and findability on LinkedIn. You can download the resource in PDF format down below this video no opt-in is required.

Lastly, if we are not connected on LinkedIn, send me a connection request and let me know how this optimization checklist helped you to improve your profile. And, if you liked this training smash that like button, share the video and subscribe to our channel not to miss the next training on LinkedIn for business growth. 

What’s Next?

If you are a coach, consultant, trainer, speaker or author, you want to discover the faster, easier way to get prospects and sales qualified leads on LinkedIn today.

At LinkedFormula we help our clients sell their digital products and services on LinkedIn and shorten the sales cycle.

This system and processes we have at LinkedFormula can put you on track to hunt down your ideal clients relatively FAST.

If you’re interested in learning more about how we can solve your lead generation problem the first step is to get the this FREE LinkedIn Guide

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Categories
LinkedIn

What Is LinkedIn Social Selling Index And How To Increase SSI Score?

[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”no” hundred_percent_height=”no” hundred_percent_height_scroll=”no” hundred_percent_height_center_content=”yes” equal_height_columns=”no” menu_anchor=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” status=”published” publish_date=”” class=”” id=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” padding_top=”” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”” padding_left=”” gradient_start_color=”” gradient_end_color=”” gradient_start_position=”0″ gradient_end_position=”100″ gradient_type=”linear” radial_direction=”center” linear_angle=”180″ background_color=”” background_image=”” background_position=”center center” background_repeat=”no-repeat” fade=”no” background_parallax=”none” enable_mobile=”no” parallax_speed=”0.3″ background_blend_mode=”none” video_mp4=”” video_webm=”” video_ogv=”” video_url=”” video_aspect_ratio=”16:9″ video_loop=”yes” video_mute=”yes” video_preview_image=”” filter_hue=”0″ filter_saturation=”100″ filter_brightness=”100″ filter_contrast=”100″ filter_invert=”0″ filter_sepia=”0″ filter_opacity=”100″ filter_blur=”0″ filter_hue_hover=”0″ filter_saturation_hover=”100″ filter_brightness_hover=”100″ filter_contrast_hover=”100″ filter_invert_hover=”0″ filter_sepia_hover=”0″ filter_opacity_hover=”100″ filter_blur_hover=”0″][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ layout=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” border_position=”all” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding_top=”” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”” padding_left=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” center_content=”no” last=”no” min_height=”” hover_type=”none” link=””][fusion_text columns=”” column_min_width=”” column_spacing=”” rule_style=”default” rule_size=”” rule_color=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_offset=””]

RELATED POSTS:


LinkedIn Social Selling Index (SSI) – is it worth paying attention to or it’s just another vanity metric on LinkedIn?

Usefulness of LinkedIn Social Selling Index score remains a topic for discussion and debate in digital marketing, sales and through leadership. 

In this blog post I’ll attempt to provide a quick overview of the LinkedIn Social Selling Index and share my thoughts with you and in the end let you know about my verdict whether you want to use it to your benefit or ignore it.  

But first of all, let’s define what social selling means and what it is about. Here is how Hootsuite defines social selling:

Social selling is the art of using social media to find, connect with, understand, and nurture sales prospects. It’s the modern way to develop meaningful relationships with potential customers so you’re the first person or brand a prospect thinks of when they’re ready to buy.

Now, let’s see how LinkedIn describes its Social Selling Index:

It’s a first-of-its-kind measure of a company’s or individual’s adaptation of the four pillars of selling on LinkedIn, based on a scale of 0 to 100.

LinkedIn’s SSI score measures you, or your company’s performance in four key areas, also known as the LinkedIn SSI pillars. They are:

  1. Create a Professional Brand

  2. Find the Right People

  3. Engage with Insights

  4. Build Strong Relationships

 

Pillar #1: Create a Professional Brand

Under this pillar basically LinkedIn looks at whether you completed all of your profile sections – headline, summary and experience, included a professional photo, banner etc.

Do you share high quality, helpful and relevant content with your followers?

How many page views are your posts generating?

How many followers have you gained?

All these metrics indicate how well you create your professional brand on LinkedIn. 

Pillar #2: Find the Right People

What LinkedIn means by finding the right people is that encourages us to prospect efficiently by reaching out and connecting to relevant people and network with them.

As a result of this, everyone wins. People on the platform benefit from the right mutual connections and what these connections bring them down the road. The platform benefits from having people stay longer on LinkedIn and coming back more often. 

To increase the score for this pillar LinkedIn wants us to use their tools such as Sales Navigator. However, you can also use their basic tools and search tools by carrying out advanced search feature to filter results or carry out Boolean searches to identify the ‘right people’. View people’s profiles. Look at who’s viewed your profile.

Basically, LinkedIn wants us to use its tools and features suite. 

Pillar #3: Engage With Insights

What LinkedIn tries to achieve with this one is to encourage its users to discover and share worthy updates conversations. And, by doing so they grow relationships on the platform. 

Here are some examples of activities you can perform to increase the score of this pillar. Follow relevant industry or topic hashtags such as #SocialSelling #Accounting or #DigitalMarketing, etc. Join relevant groups and engage with them. Comment on and share other people’s posts. 

Did you know that LinkedIn not only provides ranking juice to likes, comments, and re-shares you receive but also to likes, comments, and re-shares that you give to other people. So reposting, liking and commenting on other people’s content are also a ranking factor on its own. So, be generous with liking, sharing and commenting on other people’s content. 

By the way speaking of sharing and liking, please, like this post and share on social media as well as comment down below and let me know what you think of this content. 😀

Pillar #4: Build Relationships

The last pillar is all about strengthening your network by connecting and establishing trust with decision makers. Your score for this specific pillar is based upon the total number of connections including external connections, i.e. people from other companies and internal connections (your coworkers from the same company).

Also, it’s based on the acceptance rate for connection requests you send. 

All these four Social Selling Index pillars make up your social selling score on LinkedIn. 

Now let me hop on my computer and real quick go through each pillar and based on the example show you which component of Social Selling Index looks like and what it means. 

social selling index

My Verdict

Now, here is the question: 

Should you bother with this SSI Score too much or you simply ignore it? 

Well, here is what I think…

Even though I don’t suggest you to get hung up on these metrics and freak out by its decrease and checking them daily (the metric fluctuates and updates daily depending on your activities on LinkedIn), I think you still don’t want to ignore this completely. 

You want to check back from time to time and see how well you’re doing in terms of social selling score just to validate your activities are right on track on LinkedIn. 

Here is why.

LinkedIn would not come up with this tool and promote it heavily, if it was not important.  I think through this SSI index LinkedIn tries to accomplish two goals:

  1. It sets a benchmark and rules of the game for its users to know how they should be using the platform in order to keep it safe and beneficial for everyone.
  2. It gives us – the users a hint on how and when LinkedIn will reward our content by ranking and increasing its visibility provided that we abide by the rules and social selling principles.

I hope this post was useful and insightful for you. If so, give some love by sharing, liking and commenting down below and letting me know how you’re doing in terms of social selling and what your score is. 

What’s Next?

If you are a coach, consultant, trainer, speaker or author, you want to discover the faster, easier way to get prospects and sales qualified leads on LinkedIn today.

At LinkedFormula we help our clients sell their digital products and services on LinkedIn and shorten the sales cycle.

This system and processes we have at LinkedFormula can put you on track to hunt down your ideal clients relatively FAST.

If you’re interested in learning more about how we can solve your lead generation problem the first step is to get the this FREE LinkedIn Guide

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Categories
LinkedIn

How To Search For Clients On LinkedIn

[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”no” hundred_percent_height=”no” hundred_percent_height_scroll=”no” hundred_percent_height_center_content=”yes” equal_height_columns=”no” menu_anchor=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” status=”published” publish_date=”” class=”” id=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” padding_top=”” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”” padding_left=”” gradient_start_color=”” gradient_end_color=”” gradient_start_position=”0″ gradient_end_position=”100″ gradient_type=”linear” radial_direction=”center” linear_angle=”180″ background_color=”” background_image=”” background_position=”center center” background_repeat=”no-repeat” fade=”no” background_parallax=”none” enable_mobile=”no” parallax_speed=”0.3″ background_blend_mode=”none” video_mp4=”” video_webm=”” video_ogv=”” video_url=”” video_aspect_ratio=”16:9″ video_loop=”yes” video_mute=”yes” video_preview_image=”” filter_hue=”0″ filter_saturation=”100″ filter_brightness=”100″ filter_contrast=”100″ filter_invert=”0″ filter_sepia=”0″ filter_opacity=”100″ filter_blur=”0″ filter_hue_hover=”0″ filter_saturation_hover=”100″ filter_brightness_hover=”100″ filter_contrast_hover=”100″ filter_invert_hover=”0″ filter_sepia_hover=”0″ filter_opacity_hover=”100″ filter_blur_hover=”0″][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ layout=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” border_position=”all” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding_top=”” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”” padding_left=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” center_content=”no” last=”no” min_height=”” hover_type=”none” link=””][fusion_text columns=”” column_min_width=”” column_spacing=”” rule_style=”default” rule_size=”” rule_color=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_offset=””]

RELATED POSTS:


One of the questions when it comes to finding clients and right prospects on LinkedIn is how to perform the actual search for clients on this platform. 

Today we are going to talk about how to use LinkedIn free search features and capabilities to filter and zoom in on your qualified and high-value prospects. 

LinkedIn is especially a great source for discovering leads and future clients assuming you know how to do it right. This time we will focus on practical tips & techniques rather than a strategy that goes beyond finding clients on LinkedIn, which is a separate topic for another discussion.

So I just want to set expectations for this video right in the beginning. If you stay until the end of this training I have a free resource for you that you can learn more about social selling and our own proprietary LinkedIn F.A.S.T.™ Formula. Or, you can read my previous blog “How To Use LinkedIn To Sell More Products and Services” or watch the video where I explain in detail this very method we use at LinkedFormula. 

Ok, here are the following search types that we’ll focus on in this training today:

  1. People

  2. Companies

  3. Affimity (alumni)

  4. Boolean search

With that said let’s dive in. 

In my LinkedIn account when I start searching for prospects and leads what I start with is People. That’s the first type of search I go with. 

People

Let’s say I am looking for CPA accountants and it can be any segment or potential prospect title that your business provides service or products to. One tip here is that I always experiment with different keywords and relevant titles because people put different search words in their profiles and it’s a best practice to variate your search queries for better results.

More than that as you see LinkedIn search generates suggestions of possible places you can look for accountants on LinkedIn. 

We’ll start with the People section. Once you’re in the People section you can either go through the search results that LinkedIn provides or you can dial in further. Click All Filters and it will have more filters that you can use to be as specific and targeted as you want. 

And this is still a free LinkedIn search option but yet powerful enough. Of course with Sales Navigator you have more search options and it’s great to find your clients but today we just talk about free LinkedIn account search capabilities which I think is good enough just to get started. 

A rule of thumb here is that you want to start searching for the 2nd connections which are not in your network. Next you can pick location. If you’re a local business obviously you pick your location. If your services and products can be delivered worldwide you can pick any location. 

Next up, industry. Hopefully you know where your potential clients are and you pick that one accordingly. It could be accounting or financial services – I’d experiment here as well as I do with a keyword or title. 

You can go even deeper by selecting services they provide. Another interesting filter is the language. Maybe you’re targeting Spanish speaking accountant vs English speaking etc. 

Or you can target those who attended a specific school. We’ll touch upon this later in the training but the point is that you can select school from here as well. 

You can filter by the current or past companies these prospects worked for. 

After selecting all the filters you want click Apply and see what the results are. I will play with this until I’m happy with the results by changing the main keyword or title, changing the filters and try out all possible variations. 

And from here you go ahead and start connecting with people. Well you may ask what I should say in my message. Well, this is a topic for another discussion and I have a separate video for this one. Let’s not get distracted from our main topic which is how to perform the actual search.

Companies 

The next search type after People I like to perform is Companies. Let’s go back to the home page and start over with a new search. One of the reasons why you want to search for relevant companies is to target and reach out to employees of XYZ company to uncover more leads and potential clients.

Let’s stick with the accountant but it can be any title or a keyword. Type your keyword and click search. Under More you will see more places to look for your prospects, i.e. groups, events, schools, etc. 

We need companies – click companies. And now you have a list of companies that are somehow related to “accountant” or “accountancy”. One thing to note is that if you have a list of companies where you potential clients may work for, it’s a great way to find and connect with them. 

Here is how to do it. When you click on the company it takes you to their LinkedIn company page where you see all the employees under People of See All Employees working in that company. 

This is just another layer for more granular search provided that you know who you’re after. 

Affinity

The next search type is Affinity Search. I call it affinity because these are people or something that have affinity, common thing, shared interests with you. 

Where to find people who have shared or coming things with you? Guess who they are? They are people from your alma mater. Alumni from the college, university you attended. This is the most relevant segment in terms of finding the common thing and at least start the conversation. 

Here is how I do it. Well, let’s take my example. I graduated from University of Toronto. So I go to UofT page and I click Alumni. In your case that could be your educational institution you attended. 

Here is the cool part. You can filter those alumni that graduated in the same year as you did again at least to make sure you start the conversation right. Let’s type the keyword in this example let’s stick with “accountant.” Let’s put the years of study – start and end. 

You can even target specifically by where they live, where they work, what they do, what they studied, what they are skilled at and how you’re connected to them. This is so powerful that many even neglect this awesome opportunity that LinkedIn provides us with. This is one of my favourite search types. You have all people in front of you who are accountants and studied at the same educational institution with you. Not the same school but the institution in this example. 

I hope you can see the power of this search and I’m sure you are getting new ideas on how you can perform your own search for clients. 

Ok, so far we’ve covered People, Companies and Affinity search types. Go ahead and start playing around with your searches.

But before you go I’d like to share another tip or technique that not too many know or use it. It’s using Boolean search on LinkedIn.

Exploring millions of companies and people through search to find what you want can feel like looking for a needle in a haystack. To help us cut through the clutter and provide results that are specifically tailored to our needs, LinkedIn allows combining keywords with operators like AND, NOT, and OR during your search.

For example:

  • Quoted searches: For an exact phrase, enclose the phrase in quotation marks. For example, type “accountant CPA”. You can also use quotation marks if you want to find someone with a multi-word title.
  • NOT searches: Type the word NOT (capital letters) immediately before a search term to exclude it from your search results. This typically limits your search results. For example, “accountant NOT bookkeeper”.
  • OR searches: Type the word OR (capital letters) to see results that include one or more items in a list. This typically broadens your search results. For example, “accountant OR bookkeeper OR CPA”.
  • AND searches: AND searches: Type the word AND (capital letters) to see results that include all items in a list. This typically limits your search results. For example, “accountant AND finance AND CPA”.

You’d use Boolean search on LinkedIn to filter and zoom in on your qualified and high-value prospects. 

And, as promised at the end of this training I am going to give you a Free resource where you can find more on a strategy part of finding clients on LinkedIn. However, today as I mentioned, we were focusing more on a technical and practical aspect using LinkedIn search to find clients. 

However, combine the strategy and tactics you get it right. This is exactly what we teach our students at LinkedFormula how to sell more products and services using our proprietary social selling LinkedIn F.A.S.T.™ Formula. You can learn more at linkedformula.com. 

Let me know if you have any questions or comment below if you know a better way of searching for leads on LinkedIn. 

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Categories
LinkedIn

How To Use LinkedIn To Sell More Products and Services: LinkedIn Guide For Edupreneurs, Coaches, Consultants, Trainers, Authors and Speaker

[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”no” hundred_percent_height=”no” hundred_percent_height_scroll=”no” hundred_percent_height_center_content=”yes” equal_height_columns=”no” menu_anchor=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” status=”published” publish_date=”” class=”” id=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” padding_top=”” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”” padding_left=”” gradient_start_color=”” gradient_end_color=”” gradient_start_position=”0″ gradient_end_position=”100″ gradient_type=”linear” radial_direction=”center” linear_angle=”180″ background_color=”” background_image=”” background_position=”center center” background_repeat=”no-repeat” fade=”no” background_parallax=”none” enable_mobile=”no” parallax_speed=”0.3″ background_blend_mode=”none” video_mp4=”” video_webm=”” video_ogv=”” video_url=”” video_aspect_ratio=”16:9″ video_loop=”yes” video_mute=”yes” video_preview_image=”” filter_hue=”0″ filter_saturation=”100″ filter_brightness=”100″ filter_contrast=”100″ filter_invert=”0″ filter_sepia=”0″ filter_opacity=”100″ filter_blur=”0″ filter_hue_hover=”0″ filter_saturation_hover=”100″ filter_brightness_hover=”100″ filter_contrast_hover=”100″ filter_invert_hover=”0″ filter_sepia_hover=”0″ filter_opacity_hover=”100″ filter_blur_hover=”0″][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ layout=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” border_position=”all” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding_top=”” padding_right=”” padding_bottom=”” padding_left=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” center_content=”no” last=”no” min_height=”” hover_type=”none” link=””][fusion_text columns=”” column_min_width=”” column_spacing=”” rule_style=”default” rule_size=”” rule_color=”” hide_on_mobile=”small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”left” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_offset=””]

RELATED POSTS:


Why LinkedIn?

The better question is Why Not?

LinkedIn is the world’s largest business platform and the #1 channel for most B2B marketers to distribute content and generate leads. 

It has over 575+ million users, with more than 260 million monthly active users. Of those LinkedIn users who are engaging with the platform monthly, 40% access it on a daily basis (Source: LinkedIn).

LinkedIn is an especially good source for discovering leads. Hubspot found that LinkedIn is 277% more effective at generating leads than Facebook and Twitter.

How is this related to your business and why you should care at all?

Imagine you have a marketing system in place that is continually running in the background delivering more leads but more importantly better leads. It develops relationships with thousands of cold prospects, converts them into warm leads, and then customers over time.

The system allows you to market to them in a specific way that culminates in a request for a short phone call or a discovery session. Then all you’ll need to do is bring them into your sales process and close the sale.

But how to do that?

We have learned a 4 Step Process to be used with LinkedIn that we call it F.A.S.T.™ Formula.

What is F.A.S.T.? 

LinkedIn F.A.S.T.™ Formula is our social selling proprietary method that puts you on track to hunt down your ideal clients and comprises of four steps:

  • Foundation
  • Attraction
  • Selection
  • Targeting

Step 1: Foundation

In Foundation phase it is all about positioning you as an expert and leader that people want to engage with. 

At this stage you increase your authority as a leader in your industry using the LinkedIn platform so you were able to create meaningful conversations with your ideal prospects and convert them into high-paying clients.

Creating your authority and leadership on LinkedIn goes hand in hand with four elements of social selling.

What is social selling?

Hootsuite defines social selling as the art of using social media to find, connect with, understand, and nurture sales prospects. It’s the modern way to develop meaningful relationships with potential customers so you’re the first person or brand a prospect thinks of when they’re ready to buy.

In simpler words social selling removes the pitching component of sales and creates conversation around your products or services by teaching your potential customers about their benefits. 

Now that we know what social selling means, let’s get clear on what the main elements of social selling are on LinkedIn.

Establishing your professional brand, which involves completing your LinkedIn profile with a customer in mind. Your LinkedIn profile is NOT about you, it’s about your clients.

Finding the right people is what separates a smart marketer from a marketer. You don’t need to talk to everyone – you simply need to identify the best prospects who are qualified to work with you.

Engaging with insights is sharing and participating in conversation- worthy updates to create and grow relationships on LinkedIn.

Building relationships is the holy grail of B2B marketing today which strengthens your network by connecting and establishing trust with decision makers.

One of the ways to be seen as an authority on LinkedIn is to start optimizing your LinkedIn profile by turning it into a client attraction magnet.

Step 2: Attraction

Those in need of your solutions will be attracted to your profile and will check you out to see if you can help them.

At the end of the day marketing is simply attracting those clients you want and repelling those you don’t want. 

As Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation states the closer something is, the bigger the force of attraction becomes.

Similarly, in order to attract the right clients you need to get closer to them by knowing who they are and where they are.

Creating “marketing gravity” simply means crafting the message that cuts through the noise and resonates with your market. 

Attracting ideal clients can be done by crafting a right, distilled and razor sharp message, which is tuned-in on the same wavelength with theirs.

To do so you start talking to prospective clients’ needs and desires through meaningful conversations and position yourself as someone who can help them solve their problems. 

As a rule, it actually takes 7 to 13+ touches before most prospects will even consider doing business with you. But the problem is, most businesses don’t even make it to 4 touch points.

Microsoft’s study shows that by the fourth contact, 89% of salespeople have given up and have not moved on.

To win at selling now means helping your customers win too, fostering a discussion that uncovers their needs and proposing solutions that best fit them (Source: Salesforce).

And, this is why we pay attention to creating meaningful conversations and positioning yourself as someone who can help them solve their problems in the first place.

Step 3: Selection

In the Selection phase, you decide on which clients to target and how to reach them. 

You don’t want you to talk to everyone – you simply need to identify the best prospects who are qualified to work with you.

By selling your products and services you are improving your clients’ lives and profiting from that by growing and scaling your business.

But do you know exactly in which shape and form your product or service improves your clients’ lives? 

Knowing core benefits and competencies of your services and products will help you attract those clients who you want to work with

Here are some powerful practical tips on how to discover core benefits and attributes of your solutions and decide which clients to go after:

  • What are the top 3 strengths you believe your product/service has? (ask customers)
  • What are the top 3 weaknesses you believe your product/service has? (ask customers)
  • What is the UVP (unique value proposition) that makes your product/service the best in the world?

Answering the questions above should help you identify the main benefits and attributes of your solution. 

Then, you need to identify your ideal client. Who are the best people you are going to help? 

During your customer’s journey your product and/or service is supposed to help your clients shortcut their transformation from current reality to desired future.

Once you identify the destination where your ideal clients want to arrive at based on the intelligence and data you already have about them, you can now reverse engineer core benefits and attributes of your solution and match them with the desires and wants of your clients.

Every solution whether it is a product or service combines three main variables that help to determine which clients to target and how to reach them. 

Your ideal client is at the intersection and perfect overlap of these three core elements – passion, expertise, and market demand.

Step 4: Targeting

In the Targeting phase, you build a database with your high-value prospects implementing sniper rifle strategy.

The key here is knowing how to target potential buyers and build long-lasting business relationships with them through educating, supporting, and guiding them during their buying process.

Here are few search and targeting hacks you can use to improve your prospecting. 

Finding quality leads and building relationships with them takes time. We recommend starting with something in common to make better content and establish a common ground.

If you filter in the search and find someone who attended the same college, university as you did – this already puts you on the common ground with a prospect.

And guess what?

People like to be connecting and having conversations with people who share common interests, preferences, and education.

Another tactic from sniper rifle targeting is to put a filter for job change in the recent month or two. People who recently took over new positions in the company are expected to improve and make changes in the organization. 

Therefore, they are more open to new ideas, taking actions and partnering with you.

What’s Next?

If you are an educational entrepreneur (i.e. expert entrepreneur, coach, consultant, speaker etc.), or executive of an educational service provider, you want to discover the faster, easier way to get prospects and sales qualified leads on LinkedIn today.

At LinkedFormula we help our clients sell their digital products and services on LinkedIn and shorten the sales cycle.

This system and processes we have at LinkedFormula can put you on track to hunt down your ideal clients relatively FAST.

[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]